High Fat, Low Carb Diets Reverse Type 2 Diabetes In New Program That Bans Sugar

Part Two: Gluten-Free Diets

In his role as director of Duke’s Lifestyle Medicine Program, Dr. Westman also recently conducted a a pure garcinia cambogia six-month comparison of low-carb diets with other researchers. The diet that encourages eating carbohydrates with the lowest-possible rating on the glycemic index leads to greater improvement in blood sugar control, according to Duke University Medical Center researchers. Patients who followed the no-glycemic diet experienced more frequent reductions, and in some cases elimination, of their need for medication to control type 2 diabetes. “Low glycemic diets are good, but our work shows a no-glycemic diet is even better at improving blood sugar control,” he says.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/high-fat-low-carb-diets-reverse-type-2-diabetes-new-program-that-bans-sugar

Sunny Side Up Egg

Part Two: Gluten Free Diets Following our story about gluten-free diets: A local company joins us in the studio to share their experience in the gluten-free food market. If you would like more information about “Hodgson Mill” and the products created there, click here. If you would like more information about the “Champaign-Urbana Celiac Support Group, click here. Copyright 2014 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/13/idUSnHUGdsQR+73+ONE20140113 redistributed.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.illinoishomepage.net/story/d/story/part-two-gluten-free-diets/19556/XNEJLph4aEO8hSJwNc3p2w

This Week in Medicine: Exercise, Diets, and Implants

Does the cost of a treatment enter into your decision to prescribe it? Yes Total votes 71 | 3 comments This survey is a poll of those who choose to participate and are, therefore, not valid statistical samples, but rather a snapshot of what your colleagues are thinking. ADVERTISEMENT Connect with MedPage Today MedPageToday.com is a trusted news service for physicians that provides a clinical perspective on the breaking medical news that their patients are reading. Co-developed by MedPage Today, LLC and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, each article alerts the reader to breaking medical news, presenting that news in acontext that meets their educational practice needs.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Strokes/44429